When I hung this piece of brass wire from my garage ceiling I had never heard of Judith Brust, or imagined I would spend so many hours working with the material.     

When I hung this piece of brass wire from my garage ceiling I had never heard of Judith Brust, or imagined I would spend so many hours working with the material.     

This is the first lamp I made from brass wire.

This is the first lamp I made from brass wire.

I am way into brass wire.

One day I was at the metal recycling place and I noticed two huge bins loaded with wire. Gold in the first and silver in the second. What really caught my eye was how it had piled together in such a uniform way. It was almost as thin as human hair, but it somehow hadn't become tangled. The guy who worked there told me it was brass EDM wire and explained what it was used for. I left that day with a couple big coolers full, having no idea what I might do with it. I pulled out some of the yellow stuff, stretched it into a weird, phallic shape and stapled it to the ceiling of my garage where it hung for at least six months. At some point that winter I opened one of the coolers and pulled out a thick mass of the wire and it fell over my hand, supporting itself in a dome shape about fifteen inches in diameter. That was the moment I realized I could make a cool lampshade out of brass wire. I made one, and sold it pretty quick. But it took two more years before I understood how to make certain shapes consistently. There were no YouTube videos to watch, no community workshops to sign up for. I became my own teacher and apprentice, and eventually developed (and continue to refine) a system for efficiently producing specific shapes from brass wire. When I'm not doing that, I make non-specific shapes from brass wire, which I call art.

Judith Brust, 1991, Brass Wire

Judith Brust, 1991, Brass Wire